Ford Thunderbird

The Ford Thunderbird is a rear wheel drive automobile which was manufactured by Ford in the United States over eleven model generations from 1955 through 2005. The Thunderbird created a market niche that eventually became known as the personal luxury car.

The Thunderbird entered production for the 1955 model year as a sporty two-seat convertible. Unlike the Chevrolet Corvette, it was not marketed as a sports car. Ford positioned the Thunderbird as an upscale model and is credited in developing a new market segment, the personal luxury car. In 1958, the Thunderbird gained a second row of seats. Succeeding generations became larger until the line was downsized in 1977, again in 1980, and once again in 1983. Sales were good until the 1990s, when large 2-door coupes became unpopular. Initial production ceased at the end of 1997. In 2002, production of the Thunderbird started again; a revived 2-seat model was launched which was available through the end of the 2005 model year. From its introduction in 1955 to its final phaseout in 2005, Ford produced over 4.4 million Thunderbirds.

The Thunderbird’s modest enhancements don’t extend to its rather elastic chassis, and there’s still a lot of wind noise coming through the canvas top at freeway speeds. And it hasn’t gotten any cheaper. The as-tested price of our 2002 T-Bird came to $39,867 compared with $41,795 for this similarly equipped ’03 car. For the same money, you could strap on an Audi TT roadster, a BMW 325Ci convertible, or a Saab 9-3 convertible. To name just a few.

VEHICLE TYPE: front-engine, rear-wheel-drive, 2-passenger, 2-door roadster

PRICE AS TESTED: $41,795 (base price: $37,320)

ENGINE TYPE: DOHC 32-valve V-8, aluminum block and heads, Ford PTEC engine-control system with port fuel injection
Displacement: 241 cu in, 3950cc
Power (SAE net): 280 bhp @ 6000 rpm
Torque (SAE net): 286 lb-ft @ 4000 rpm

TRANSMISSION: 5-speed automatic with lockup torque converter

DIMENSIONS:
Wheelbase: 107.2 in Length: 186.3 in
Curb weight: 3800 lb

C/D TEST RESULTS:
Zero to 60 mph: 6.5 sec
Zero to 100 mph: 16.8 sec
Street start, 5-60 mph: 6.9 sec
Standing 1/4-mile: 15.0 sec @ 95 mph
Top speed (governor limited): 132 mph
Braking, 70-0 mph: 183 ft
Roadholding, 300-ft-dia skidpad: 0.85 g

FUEL ECONOMY:
EPA city driving: 17 mpg
C/D-observed: 16 mpg

The Foolproof Classic Car

The Foolproof Classic Car Hire in Los Angeles Strategy

After you’ve picked up your car rental in Los Angeles, you’re free to resist the traffic and learn more about the city. A premium car rental isn’t for everybody. Compact car rentals are perfect if you’re searching for the option that’s cost friendly that still offer you an enjoyable ride. A midsize automobile rental is ideal if you desire the exact features as a compact with low gas consumption, but with a bit more room to spare for any excess luggage you might have. If you believe an electric vehicle rental is for you have a look at this article that provides eco friendly travel tips so that you may make certain you win’t leave any ecological footprint! If it comes to booking a timeless vehicle rental in Los Angeles we are your final provider. Traditional automobile rental in LA give you the capacity to experience one of the greatest cities on earth in an auto that will take you back in time.

What You Need to Do About Classic Car Hire in Los Angeles

The typical and expected Lamborghini rental can supply you with the antidote which you want. For travelers that are looking for an enjoyable experience, California vacations provide a chance to unwind and to delight in a wide array of destination choices. Thus, putting California vacations in addition to your list is essential. Regency Car Rentals have the basic cars in demand for most rental needs. If you’re planning for lengthier vacation or business trip we also offer you the best cars for long-term too. If you’re planning a unique holiday like a honeymoon you might want to create the trip even more memorable is by choosing a luxury car.

1957 Ferrari 335 Sport Scaglietti

 

1957 Ferrari 335 Sport Scaglietti

The Ferrari 335 S was a sports racing car produced by Italian manufacturer Ferrari in 1957-8. Four cars were produced in total. An evolution of the 315 S, it had a V12 engine with a greater 4,023.32 cc (245.518 cu in) displacement and a maximum power of 390 horsepower (290 kW) at 7400 rpm; the maximum speed was around 300 kilometres per hour (190 mph). The car was a direct response to the Maserati 450S which with its 4.5-litre engine was threatening to overpower the 3.8-litre 315S and 3.5-litre 290MM.

You might be wondering:

This is one of the rarest Ferraris in existence and it has become one of the most expensive car ever sold at auction. Price tag: £25 million, or about $36 million.

 

1957 Jaguar XKSS

1957_Jaguar_XKSS

This XKSS was counted as part of the stock of unsold D-types on November 21, 1956. On June 12 1957, it was sold to Stanley McRobert of Montreal, who raced and hillclimbed in Canada with some success including at Harewood Acres. Two races entered resulting in a first and second finish. In October, at the Mount Gabriel hillclimb, the Jaguar finished first and set the fastest time and held the course record for several years. This car went through several owners who raced at Harewood Acres and at the Mosport Canadian Grand Prix. It continued to race through 1961. It then moved to an owner in Ohio, and later in New York, but around 1980 was sold to John Harper in England. He had it converted by Lynx Engineering to D-Type specification and the car continued to be raced by Harper and later by Jaguar guru John Pearson in the United Kingdom. In 1993 the car returned to the United States. it is now privately owned and is used for vintage racing and tours. In 2000 it was used for vintage racing and tours and was converted back to an XKSS Jaguar specification.

1954 mercedes benz 300 SL Gullwing

 

The speed of the 300 SL was a surprise to no one – it had been based directly on the 300 SL (W 194) racing car of 1952. The W 194 was the first Mercedes-Benz racing car designed since WWII, and it landed on the world stage with a slew of victories in its first year, including the 24 Hours of Le Mans, Bern-Bremgarten, the Eifelrennen at Nürburgring, and the iconic Carrera Panamericana.

The idea of taking the now globally famous Mercedes-Benz W 194 and building a road car was first suggested by Max Hoffman. He was quite possibly the most influential man in the automotive world in the mid-20th century who didn’t actually work for a manufacturer. He was a car importer based in New York, but he had been born and raised in Vienna – so he had a clear understanding of the thought processes on both sides of the North Atlantic.

Weighing just 50 kilograms, the innovative spaceframe was a lightweight structure that offered maximum rigidity. The only downside, on account of the extra height at the sills, was its incompatibility with conventional doors. Mercedes-Benz engineers solved this problem with the introduction of upswinging “Gullwing” doors.